The Psychology of SCD

waiting-room

At 2am, in an empty hospital waiting room, we squared off.

(The respected, 30-year surgeon and me.)

He had just successfully operated on my dad and I was tremendously grateful, but there were still things to be talked about.

As my mom and sister nervously watched, we intensely debated his plans for my dad. My heart raced after I asked the tough questions that required me to explain them medically and support with data.

After the tough stuff was done, he took another 15 minutes to chat with me about how and why I knew so much. He kept digging, and I was trying to dance around the real answers… until I gave him what he wanted, exactly what we do here on the blog, in our products and 1-on-1 consulting program. He was supportive and intrigued – a response I didn’t see coming.

Afterwards, I chatted with my family and they wondered why I was dancing and not more direct with my answers. Emotionally drained and sleep derived, it was actually remarkably clear. I’ve seen this before in other areas… this was an important test of my beliefs.

Do you REALLY believe it Steve? Because either way you are about to create it. [click to continue…]

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Have you ever grabbed any old tool hoping it will get the job done? Even when you know there is a specialty tool that would do it better?

I have many times.

It seems like the whole time I’m trying to get the job done, sweating and struggling; the little voice in the back of my head keeps reminding me that there is a better, faster or safer way to do it.

I think about this conundrum often.

The Right “Tool” Is Always Preferred – Except…

When it’s not.

On one hand, we have path #1, in which I’m happy to have taken action to get what I wanted. I didn’t let fear, resistance or the lack of a “tool” stop me from getting the job done. I thought of something, and started it moments later. No need for the right tool, because I used creativity, hard work and problem solving skills to get it done.

Path #1 example: Like last week, when I was trying to replace the battery in my alarm clock. Instead of using the right screwdriver I backed the screws out with a dime, but it took me forever!

On the other hand, by not choosing path #2, I have wasted time, resources and pain because I choose not to do it with the proper tool or method. There was a better way and I didn’t use it. All I needed to do was do a bit of planning, learning or investing and it would have been simpler, faster and cheaper.

Path #2 example: I’ve been learning how to make homemade ice cream, it turns out you can do it without any special equipment, but recently I bought an ice cream maker. Now, instead of waiting 24hrs I can make a smoother flavor ice cream in 30 minutes.

Path 1 or Path 2 will usually get you what you want over time. But, there are different trade-offs for choosing either. You might trade more time and sweat for more money, like in example 1 or trade less money for more time and quality in example 2. In every decision, there is always a trade-off and understanding what you’re willing to trade is very important.

Sometimes NOT having the right tool or info is used as a reason to not do something… [click to continue…]

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evaluate-digestive-healing

This is a guest post series from Matt Robinson, digestive illness coach at Natural Digestive Healing.

This is the last post in our Big Picture series. (Read Post One, Post Two, Post Three) If you are using this series to its fullest, remember to get out a pen and paper so you will be ready to jot down ideas and think about the questions and concepts posed along the way.

In the first post, I discussed the value of a big picture outlook, and introduced the concepts of balance and prioritization as they relate to healing from digestive illness. In the second post, I expanded on those concepts, and walked through the first steps of developing a big picture-focused healing plan. In the third post, we used your Go-sion and your SMART goals to design a healing plan.

In this post we will ask four questions:

1. How do I know if my plan is working; how will I know if I need to change something?
2. How can I discern trends, either positive or negative?
3. If I need to change something, how will I know what to change?
4. What is the (hard and simple) secret to healing?

Knowing Your Body; Observing Healing

As you implement your healing plan, how will you know what is working and what is not?
[click to continue…]

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This is a guest post series from Matt Robinson, digestive illness coach at Natural Digestive Healing.

This is the third post in our Big Picture series. (Read Post One and Post Two.) If you are using this series to its fullest, remember to get out a pen and paper so you will be ready to jot down ideas and think about the questions and concepts posed along the way.

In the first post, I discussed the value of a big picture outlook, and introduced the concepts of balance and prioritization as they relate to healing from digestive illness. In the second post, I expanded on those concepts, and walked through the first steps of developing a big picture-focused healing plan. In this post, we will use your Go-sion and your SMART goals to design a healing plan. As we go, remember, your healing goals and plan are living documents. Today, we will design a good first outline, but allow yourself the space to rework the plan if needed. [click to continue…]

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“Hey, can you pass me those chips?”

I’m sure I’ll hear that about 10 times this Memorial Day weekend. I won’t be at a Paleo or SCD cookout and I doubt I’m alone.

When I grab that bag and toss it to my buddy, what goes through my head? In the past, I’ve had all kind of thoughts like…

“Agh, why do people actually eat these nasty things.”

“Oooh no, they smell so good, I want to eat the whole bag.”

“Don’t they understand that these little death squares are going to kill them?”

“Don’t make me touch it. Aghh, the flavor, the salsa, I need to put chip-to-mouth!!!”

I’m not bipolar, but reading those lines might give you that impression. 

That’s because it’s all out of context. The sun isn’t shining; the smell of gas, grease and summer isn’t filling your nostrils. You’re not reading this around 10 of your friends, most of who don’t eat real food. [click to continue…]

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