Constipation
If you want to skip ahead, we’re hosting a 2.5-hour live event on constipation and strategies to beat it once and for all, so you can safely begin pooping again.  RSVP here.

If you can’t poop… pretty much all you can think about is pooping. It’s really annoying. I’ve been there.

If you’re reliant on enemas, laxatives, or coffee to poop, I’m here to tell you that’s not normal and it’s not healthy.

You are constipated.

If you have to push, strain, and fight for every bowel movement, that’s a big red flag something is wrong.

You are constipated.

If your poops are hard, small, or painful when they come out…

You are constipated.

And if it hasn’t already gotten worse, it’s probably going to. How bad? Here’s my personal experience.

Hemorrhoids are Certainly Not Sexy (and Definitely Painful)

How do I know? I’ve battled with them. I used to be VERY constipated.
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enemas

After seeing private 1-on-1 clients for a few years, I was consistently shocked at how many constipated clients reported things like, “I use 1 or 2 enemas a week because the constipation is so bad.”

Everytime I heard this it made me cringe. I knew that these people were doing their best to poop as often as they could, which in my opinion is better than being constipated. But they likely had no idea how dangerous enema usage for chronic constipation can be.

In the alternative health world enemas seem to get a free pass. But I doubt so many people would use them if they knew about the following concerns.

As you’ll soon learn, I’m not suggesting that very occasional (not monthly) usage of enemas is bad.

I think that when used as suggested by doctors for colonoscopy prep and to avoid further complications that can come from constipation, such as toxic megacolon, impacted stools or hemorrhoids, they can be a wonderful tool.

A Seemingly Harmless Tool for Constipation

Enemas are often a go-to for people experiencing chronic constipation.These seemingly harmless constipation fixes are available over-the-counter in different forms:

  • Sodium phosphate (referred to as saline)
  • Bisacodyl
  • Oil based

Each of these types of enemas achieve their laxative effects via different pathways.

The Interesting Ways Enemas Work

Interestingly enough, enemas don’t just flush water in there to help you get the poop out. They work in some very novel ways.

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senna-pods-mortar-and-pestle

We are a constipated nation. If you’ve ever struggled with constipation, like me, you know how painful it can be. And with 15-20% (or over 42 million people) in the United States struggling with it I know I’m not alone.

So, what should constipated people do? If you head to the local drugstore, it’s likely you’ll end up buying a product that contains an herbal laxative.

But have you ever paused to wonder: are these things dangerous?

As someone who used to be constipated I wondered the same thing. And so I decided to dive into the research to see what I could find out about herbal laxatives.

And as always, the story is more complex and contextual than anyone, including myself, would like it to be.

Let’s first be clear: constipation is a serious issue and if you’re not regularly eliminating the waste of your body you’ll start recirculating it. And you’re raising your risk of serious medical issues such as hemorrhoids, toxic megacolon and possibly colon cancer.

What’s important is to begin a short-term intervention to start pooping again, but the question is… where do you start?

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graphic-designer

We’re looking for a long-term partnership with a Graphic Designer to help us with our Baby, a new, more inclusive website for any and all digestive related issues. Design and branding are going to be the critical thread that holds it all together.

This is a paid position you can do from home and would probably start out as a 10-or-so hour per week role, with room for growth as this project grows.

We’re Looking For Someone Who:

  1. Knows our community, is familiar with our work, and wants to help further it.
  2. Is highly creative, artistic, and serious about branding and design. You probably have done graphic design for years and you like to help turn a big vision into something that customers rave about.
  3. “Gets” that design isn’t all about beauty, but also about function and consumption. Is always thinking about how design enhances learning and enjoyment of products.
  4. Enjoys working alone most of the time. The work you’ll be doing is typically alone. If you’re the type of person who likes to chit-chat with people and interact with friends a lot, this probably isn’t right for you.
  5. Has the flexibility to work at least 1-2 hours a day – but can also put in longer days for big project deadlines.
  6. Has experience creatively expressing the ‘feel’ of a larger brand through all mediums (website, logos, PDF, images, products, etc.).
  7. Is extremely dependable… not the “This usually doesn’t happen, but it happened again” type.
  8. Doesn’t take things personally, have feelings hurt easily or get offended by design feedback. Stays objective and likes to go with the flow of the design revision process as things evolve. Such is the life during revisions…
  9. Is the type of person who can take creative control and drive the project forward with their own ideas, not just following directions.

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stomach-pain-of-death

It feels like 100 knives stabbing me in the stomach.

Over and over.

Hour after hour.

I call it “The Stomach Pain of Death” (and I HATE it). In case you’re wondering, in the past I typically crawled up on the couch or bed and just wished it would end. Sometimes I would cry.

Yes, I’ve even thought death might be better at times.

Sound dramatic? Well, I don’t wish this upon anyone, but if you’ve experienced it you understand.

I remember experiencing it as a kid. And then over and over throughout my adult life. It started getting really bad in 2009, and it was one of the biggest motivators for me to change my health.

But last week I had to sit in a room with over 70 people and not move… while I got stabbed for hours.

It was a new level of hell.

Why didn’t I curl up and cry, take pills, drink alcohol or seek some other distraction to run from the pain?

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